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You’ve heard that you should be blog­ging if you’re a pho­to­gra­pher. You’ve seen more and more shoo­ters with blogs. Heck, you’ve pro­bab­ly even star­ted one yours­elf! Do you know why that blog is so cri­ti­cal, and the most important things you need to do to make sure it’s worth the time? Well, let’s figu­re it out! So, you might alrea­dy have a blog, or you might be con­si­de­ring one. Befo­re we dive in, a quick shout out to our awe­so­me reader Erin, who sug­gested this topic. Eit­her way, let’s start off by tal­king about the rea­sons why blog­ging is so important for pho­to­graph­ers.

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Pho­to­gra­phy is a ser­vice, and a per­so­nal one at that. Your cli­ents are let­ting you into their lives, and trus­ting you with some pret­ty big moments. The more you can give them rea­son to feel com­for­ta­ble with hiring you, the bet­ter. A blog is a per­fect tool for doing just that. It gives you the oppor­tu­ni­ty to show who you are, why you are a pho­to­gra­pher, and what value you can pro­vi­de to a pro­s­pec­tive cli­ent. It gives them a look into your moti­va­tions and how you tre­at your clients—info that will be important to their decisi­on. And, of cour­se, it lets them see your latest and grea­test work!

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Ano­t­her bene­fit is that blogs are a real­ly gre­at way for your cli­ents to sha­re the images you took of them! Peop­le love see­ing their own pho­tos on their photographer’s blog, and will sha­re the link with all their fami­ly and fri­ends. Um….hello awe­so­me word-of-mouth mar­ke­ting!! Your cli­ents might even ask you if they’ll make the blog, they’re so exci­ted to be fea­tured. Take the time to make gre­at posts for your cli­ents, sha­re why you enjoy­ed working with them, and they’ll love the expe­ri­ence, and spread the word about you. Win-win!! At the core, a blog is going to let you start estab­li­shing your per­so­nal brand. You can get your uni­que voice across thanks to the nar­ra­ti­ve style of a blog.

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When you are just get­ting star­ted (as in, during you first 5 – 10 years as a shoo­ter) you are pro­bab­ly going to be impro­ving your work at a very rapid rate. Port­fo­lio sites have a ten­den­cy to get sta­gnant, and many pho­to­graph­ers neglect to update them regu­lar­ly. pro­s­pec­tive cli­ents are see­ing your newest (and likely best) images. A blog ensu­res that pro­s­pec­tive cli­ents are see­ing your newest (and likely best) images. That ensu­res that they are fami­li­ar with your cur­rent shoo­ting style, which also has a ten­den­cy to evol­ve! Blogs are also bet­ter for SEO than port­fo­lio sites, sin­ce they have fre­quent updates and lots of tas­ty con­tent.

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Ano­t­her bene­fit is that blogs are a real­ly gre­at way for your cli­ents to sha­re the images you took of them! Peop­le love see­ing their own pho­tos on their photographer’s blog, and will sha­re the link with all their fami­ly and fri­ends. Um….hello awe­so­me word-of-mouth mar­ke­ting!! Your cli­ents might even ask you if they’ll make the blog, they’re so exci­ted to be fea­tured. Take the time to make gre­at posts for your cli­ents, sha­re why you enjoy­ed working with them, and they’ll love the expe­ri­ence, and spread the word about you. Win-win!! At the core, a blog is going to let you start estab­li­shing your per­so­nal brand. You can get your uni­que voice across thanks to the nar­ra­ti­ve style of a blog.

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Pic­tu­re what may just be one of the sca­riest sce­n­a­ri­os in your care­er: The net­work has slo­wed to a crawl. You can bare­ly hold a manage­ment inter­face, let alo­ne con­trol the net­work ele­ments invol­ved. The attack pro­pa­ga­tes, and as it does you watch your ser­vices drop one by one. Panic sets in. You’re expe­ri­en­cing a Deni­al of Ser­vice (DoS) attack. All resour­ces are focu­sed on stam­ping this fire out—and that may very well be the inten­ti­on of the atta­ckers. A DoS attack might be a smo­ke­s­creen to get you to focus else­whe­re while the intru­der goes about covert busi­ness in a much safer fashion, lea­ving litt­le foren­sics after­ward.

Unordered list

  • TCP, UDP, ICMP, Floods;
  • DNS, NTP, SNMP, SSDP, Spe­ci­fic floods;
  • over­laps, mis­sing, too many;
  • slow READ or loop calls.

Ordered list

  1. TCP, UDP, ICMP, Floods;
  2. DNS, NTP, SNMP, SSDP, Spe­ci­fic floods;
  3. over­laps, mis­sing, too many;
  4. slow READ or loop calls.

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The­se methods are often over­lap­ped in a tar­ge­ted fashion. In essence the attack is a series of waves that each hit in vary­ing degrees of sophisti­ca­ti­on and focus. Other times the attack is rela­tively pri­mi­ti­ve and easy to iso­la­te. The rea­son for this is that in the simp­lest levels, it’s an easy thing to do.

As an examp­le, a dis­grunt­led stu­dent, upset over a new ven­ding matching poli­cy, could mount a DoS attack against his or her school admi­nis­tra­ti­on. On the other end of the spec­trum is a much dar­ker orches­tra­ti­on, the sleight of the hand to get you to look else­whe­re. This is typi­cal­ly the signa­tu­re of an Advan­ced Per­sis­tent Thre­at.…Charles Sin­gle­ton

Unless an attack is very simp­le and short-lived, it needs to be dis­tri­bu­t­ed in the way it ope­ra­tes. It needs to be gene­ra­ted from various points of ori­gin. This is refer­red to as a DDoS attack. The atta­cker needs to coor­di­na­te a series of end points to exe­cu­te some par­ti­cu­lar event at the same point in time or perhaps, in more sophisti­ca­ted examp­les, as pha­sed against a time series.

Some other styles

Bold Text: The­re is a basic, first situa­ti­on when it’s not a good idea to do inten­si­ty pre­scrip­ti­ons.

Ita­lic: The­re is a basic, first situa­ti­on when it’s not a good idea to do inten­si­ty pre­scrip­ti­ons.

Strike-through: The­re is a basic, first situa­ti­on when it’s not a good idea to do inten­si­ty pre­scrip­ti­ons.

Link: The­re is a basic, first situa­ti­on when it’s not a good idea to do inten­si­ty pre­scrip­ti­ons.

Inli­ne Code: There is a basic, first situation when it's not a good idea to do intensity prescriptions.

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Navi­ga­ting the seas of custo­mer expe­ri­ence manage­ment today might be com­pa­red to the chal­len­ges of the anci­ent mari­ners explo­ring new ter­ri­to­ries. Custo­mer expec­ta­ti­ons, always on the move, are trans­forming with each new inno­va­ti­on in com­mu­ni­ca­ti­ons.

Like tho­se unknown waters of the once unchar­ted oce­ans it is dif­fi­cult to know the sea lanes of posi­ti­ve custo­mer inter­ac­tions from the rocky sho­als of dis­sa­tis­fied custo­mers and cli­ents. One of the ways that the tides of custo­mer pre­fe­rence are shif­ting are how buy­ers and cli­ents wish to com­mu­ni­ca­te with orga­ni­za­ti­ons. The impor­t­an­ce of the voice con­ver­sa­ti­on is ebbing. Espe­ci­al­ly for the up and com­ing genera­ti­ons of con­su­mers the tide of voice is on the wane.

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The Small Busi­ness Admi­nis­tra­ti­on quo­tes Niel­sen as say­ing, “Except for the 65-plus age group, teen­agers talk the least on their pho­nes.” The trend is just as appa­rent in the next two more seni­or demo­gra­phics. Accord­ing to the Expe­ri­an Mar­ke­ting Ser­vices’ 2013 Digi­tal Mar­ke­ter, “48 per­cent of adults ages 18 to 24 say that a con­ver­sa­ti­on via text mes­sa­ge is just as mea­ning­ful as a tele­pho­ne call.”

This same demo­gra­phic the report con­ti­nues, sends or recei­ve 3,853 texts in an average month. As a parent of two in this age group I can attest to the­se num­bers. When I wish to reach my sons, I text them. Expe­ri­an goes on to point out that text messa­ging is also beco­m­ing increa­singly important to other buy­ing groups. One important examp­le are tho­se 25 to 34 who have made a recent dra­ma­tic shift to valuing text messa­ging as a com­mu­ni­ca­ti­on medi­um. Yet, while map­ping a cour­se to pro­fit and custo­mer sustai­na­bi­li­ty, rela­tively few orga­ni­za­ti­ons today have dis­co­ve­r­ed text messa­ging.

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For enter­pri­se orga­ni­za­ti­ons around the world, Soft­ware Defi­ned Net­wor­king (SDN) is trans­forming the way we build and ope­ra­te our net­wor­king infra­st­ruc­tu­re. Simi­lar to the way vir­tua­li­za­ti­on tech­no­lo­gy has revo­lu­tio­ni­zed app­li­ca­ti­on ser­vers and sto­rage, we are now going through the same evo­lu­ti­on on the net­wor­king side of the house. The pro­mi­se of SDN tou­ches on several aspec­ts.

Sim­pli­ci­ty and speed of rol­ling out new ser­vices across an orga­ni­za­ti­on is one. Fle­xi­bi­li­ty and ope­ra­tio­nal effi­ci­en­ci­es to redu­ce cost is ano­t­her. Howe­ver one of the most cri­ti­cal aspec­ts of SDN is its impli­ca­ti­ons on secu­ri­ty. With the almost wee­kly news of hackers pene­tra­ting cri­ti­cal insti­tu­ti­ons around the world, this can­not come soon enough. Let’s look at three ways SDN can help orga­ni­za­ti­ons secu­re their net­works and keep hackers at bay. Net­work Micro-Seg­men­ta­ti­on. Net­works were ori­gi­nal­ly desi­gned to con­nect devices and users tog­e­ther.

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Using one phy­si­cal con­ver­ged net­work makes sen­se from a cost and manage­ment per­spec­tive, but SDN would allow us split­ting up this net­work into secu­re iso­la­ted zones. An atta­cker, whe­ther an exter­nal hacker or even a dis­grunt­led employee, will not be able to have access to any net­work ser­vices out­si­de of their allo­ca­ted zone. Micro-seg­men­ta­ti­on allows for even fur­ther gra­nu­la­ri­ty, sepa­ra­ting indi­vi­du­al ser­vers, devices, or users into uni­que secu­re zones.